Cockran’s Mall Sligo in the 19th Century

Originally posted on Sligo Walking Tours:
Art murals by the talented late Sligo artist Bernard McDonagh on the walls of the back bar in the Embassy/The Belfry on Kennedy Parade, Sligo. McDonagh was influenced by the local history of the street, recreating scenes of Linenhall Street in the late 18 century and early 19th century.     In the late 18th century, the street was… Continue reading Cockran’s Mall Sligo in the 19th Century

Sligo and the Dracula connection

Originally posted on Sligo Walking Tours:
The author Bram Stoker’s mother hailed from Sligo. Her name was Charlotte Thornley and she lived with her parents Captain Thomas Thornley, Matilda Blake Thornley along with her two younger brothers Thomas and Richard. Charlotte lived with her family on Correction Street now Old Market Street in the town. It was here where she resided in 1832 aged 14 years… Continue reading Sligo and the Dracula connection

Cholera Remedy in 1832

Originally posted on Sligo Walking Tours:
In the Summer of 1832, 186 years ago, an outbreak of Cholera was spreading throughout Ireland. Cures and remedy advertisements appeared in newspapers. The text below appeared as an advert for an Apothecary in Sligo. This may have helped some people as dehydration was one of the symptoms. Unfortunately, as many would have taken this mixture with water which… Continue reading Cholera Remedy in 1832

Landed in Van Diemen’s Land

Van Diemen’s Land was set up as a penal colony in 1803 by the British Empire. It is estimated that some 75,000 convicts were shipped there up until 1853 when the mass transportation of people ended. The most common crime that led to transportation was petty theft or larceny. Followed by burglary or housebreaking, highway robbery, stealing clothing, stealing animals, military offences, prostitution and crimes … Continue reading Landed in Van Diemen’s Land

Sligo Dark Tales – The perils of travelling alone in the 18th-Century

Originally posted on Sligo Walking Tours:
From the newspaper archives comes the late eighteenth-century story of two young boys herding cattle on Doomore mountain near Coolaney, County Sligo. Booleying farming was an agriculture practice carried out in Ireland. This is where younger members of the farming community usually a teenage girl or boy, would go uphill with cattle to higher pastures to allow the cattle to… Continue reading Sligo Dark Tales – The perils of travelling alone in the 18th-Century

Sebastian Barry Literary Trail – Café Cairo

Are you a fan of the Secret Scripture?  this café is referenced throughout all three books and provides the backdrop to many scenes from the books.  As a child, Eneas’s mother brings him here for tea as they sheltered from the rain in The Whereabouts of Eneas McNulty, “usually they would not go into such a place, out of respect for the expense of bought tea..” after visiting the Cathedral. The Café … Continue reading Sebastian Barry Literary Trail – Café Cairo

Literary Trail – Sebastian Barry – 2nd Location

Literary Trail based on the novels – The Whereabouts of Eneas McNulty, The Secret Scripture and The Temporary Gentleman. Welcome back, the next point of interest on the Sebastian Barry Literary trail is located only a short walk from the main street in Sligo Town.  (You can click here to view the 1st point on the Literary trail.) 2. The Lungey House The second location is only … Continue reading Literary Trail – Sebastian Barry – 2nd Location

Old sligo street

In the footsteps of Eneas McNulty

Are you a fan of Sebastian Barry’s fictional trilogy about the McNulty family, Eneas, Roseanne, Jack and Mai ? Experience Sligo from the characters’ perspective.  Check out the melcoo literary trail to follow in the footsteps of your favourite characters. Over the  next few weeks, we will be posting a walking tour series about the streets and buildings in Sligo that helped inspire the novels.  Sebastian Barry’s novels have become a … Continue reading In the footsteps of Eneas McNulty